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Service Standard

How we’re improving the Service Manual’s guidance and navigation

A cup saying Service Manual, Service Standard next to a computer showing the landing page of GOV.UK Service Manual

The Service Manual team shares how they worked with cross-government communities of practice on guidance and used a design sprint to improve navigation.

What we’re doing to make the Service Manual community-led

A laptop screen showing a web page on contacting the Service Manual and Service Standard team

In this blog post, the team behind the Service Manual gives an update on their work and how they collaborate with cross-government communities.

Taking a community-led approach to the Service Standard and Service Manual

Close-up of a laptop screen showing the website of the GOV.UK Service Manual stating its purpose: Helping teams to create and run great public services that meet the Service Standard.

The Service Standard and Manual have been around since 2013 and continuously evolved since then. In summer 2020, a new team started taking things into a new direction. In this blog post, they share what they have learned in recent months and why the future is community-led.

Not meeting the Service Standard doesn’t mean you failed

A sticker with the Crown symbol saying ‘ASSESSOR – Digital Service Assessments’ on a white notebook

Service assessments ensure that a digital service is meeting the points of the Service Standard. But there have been times when services have not met the standard. That doesn’t mean failure. This blog post discusses the opportunities and support available for service teams.

We’re changing the way we do service assessments to support coronavirus related services

A person writing a COVID-19 services peer review discussion report on a laptop computer, on the screen a headline reads: 1. Understand users and their needs (Point 1)

In recent weeks, we have seen a surge in government activity needing services to be launched at very short notice. So we created a condensed version of service assessments to make sure services are still secure, resilient and accessible, focusing on the riskiest factors to launch.

How to run a remote service assessment

A laptop screen showing a remote service assessment taking place via video conference software with various people dialled in looking at a shared presentation headlined ‘How we fit into the service line’

The Standards Assurance Service Team at the Government Digital Service has adapted to running service assessments remotely. Here is our advice on how to make sure the remote service assessment works well.

Service assessments improvements: Understanding the Standard

An assessor forum: Two people sitting at a table with two documents in front of them reading “Solve a whole problem for users” and “We think there are four interlinked parts to point 2. By the end of alpha, your team should be able to explain…”; another person is sitting opposite of them in a hot chair, responding to their questions

This second of 3 posts on improvements to service assessments focusses on what we’re doing to make sure assessors and service teams have a consistent understanding of updated Service Standard. It introduces assessor forums and the ‘Private Beta’ for the Standard.